Chick this out ūüź§

A wreath of chicks – how springy we hear you say (^-^)

How could we resist?  These crazy chicks make for a perfectly manic Easter decoration.

All you need is 100 chenille chicks, superglue and a ring of cardboard.  Obvi*

The joy of making this is immense.  Buying packs and packs of chicks is just the beginning. Chopping off their feet for a more glueable surface adds great comic value, then placing them side by side and watching your ring fill up equals complete satisfaction.

Herein starts another crazy chick tradition¬†ūüź§ Huzzah!

Craft of the month club

Lets go on a craftventure (^-^)

This year we want to explore new crafts in the hopes of uncovering a new favourite. ¬†Eims may have settled on her No.1 but I’m still excited to experiment.

This month we’ll be picking up jewellery (making).

Before Christmas, Lil D and I made a supercute shrink plastic charm bracelet. ¬†She drew and coloured christmassy characters, we baked them in the oven then I struggled to attach them to a bracelet for her. ¬†Convinced, I was, to use the correct tools for the job. ¬†Various nosed pliers later and I decided handmade jewellery could be January’s challenge.

Just a few charms, jump rings and jewellery fixings are needed.  Then a sprinkling of imagination.

My first attempt was with steampunk cogs. I played around with arranging the charms before settling on a cute pair of earrings and a simple linked keyring.  Not too bad for a beginner (^-^)

Book angels

Book angel

The Librarian in work is a little obsessed with Christmas.  She was quite insistent that we put up hundreds of posters advertising a carol service in the library; was not pleased that no-one wanted to put up the Christmas tree on the very first day of December (and when a bat flew out of that very Christmas tree it was a little less Christmassy than expected); and she wanted decorations everywhere. Or rather she wanted angels made from books everywhere.

Even after the bat incident she would not be deterred.

Thank goodness for the internet. ¬†A quick google for ‘book angels craft’ led me to this site, which was simple enough for me to follow. Let’s see if I can explain them. ¬†Though I’d recommend looking at the link, ‘cos the pictures make it really clear.

First take a paperback book with 120 or so pages (rip a book in half if it’s too big- I made 2 angels per book). ¬†Remove the cover and bend the spine, but don’t break.

Now fold the first page in half (top corner to the spine).

Fold that triangle in half again.

Repeat for the next 20 or so pages (you can make a Christmas tree is you just keep folding in this way through all the pages).

For the wings, fold from the bottom corner up to the spine for the next five or so pages, varying the size of the second fold so that the wings feather out a little.

Next page go back to folding from the top down until you are ready for another wing.  Repeat the bottom fold technique for 5 pages, then finish off the rest with the top fold.

Find a christmas bauble and attach to the top for a head.

Easy, if time consuming.

I admit I quickly discovered a joy in the repetitive folding of pages (the ripping up of a book first helped discharge a little of the frustration at being forced to craft).  By the end of the day 4 angels were made and ready to be admired.

Which is why I have to admit that the Librarian was right…they are pretty impressive. ¬†They sit proudly in the library and have been given so many compliments that I am now, begrudgingly, proud of them.

Only one complaint has been lodged, from a book lover. ¬†But I did choose the oldest, least used book that was headed for a charity shop, so I think that’s just called recycling.

How’s that for Christmas spirit?